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Claire Foy featured in Vanity Fair’s 24th Annual Hollywood Issue

Claire Foy featured in Vanity Fair’s 24th Annual Hollywood Issue

By: James Wolcott

In the quarter-century since Vanity Fair launched the Hollywood Issue, show business has changed in fundamental ways, as have magazines. But a star-studded, foldout cover remains a surefire thrill. This year’s portfolio goes inside the cover’s creation, which took place in L.A. and New York as Annie Leibovitz photographed 12 of film and TV’s most iconic actors—with a non-actor corralled for the shoot for his last V.F. hurrah.

The films and TV shows represented by the actors in this year’s Hollywood Portfolio—which for the first time offers a behind-the-scenes look at the shoot—took the #MeToo movement in stride, offering strong women in leading roles, as well as strong men supporting them. Here we have Reese Witherspoon and Nicole Kidman summoning the women’s battle cry of Big Little Lies alongside Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee, the indispensable sidekick to The Post heroine Katharine Graham. There’s also Claire Foy and Gal Gadot, embodiments of their formidable characters, the Queen and Wonder Woman, and one possible future female president in the mix. Movies have always thrived on relevance, and this year’s cover stars don’t hesitate to make a statement about the times we’re living in and the changes that need to happen.

[…]

CLAIRE FOY, actor.
7 films, including Unsane (2018); 16 television shows, including The Crown, Season Two (2017).

Quintessential Englishness is the viola Claire Foy plays, usually in period costume. Foy was outfitted with the poshy title of Lady Persephone Towyn in the remake of Upstairs, Downstairs (BBC), lost her head as Anne Boleyn on Wolf Hall (BBC), and was reconstituted for greatness as Queen Elizabeth II on The Crown (Netflix), contending with a moody husband, a lumbering Winston Churchill, a sprawling empire, and the deadweight of protocols and precedents—all while maintaining cameo-brooch composure. In royalty, as in theater, the show must go on.

Read the full article at Vanity Fair.

Categories "The Crown" Gallery

Gallery Update: ‘The Crown’ 2.01 Screencaps & More

Gallery Update: ‘The Crown’ 2.01 Screencaps & More

HD screencaps of Claire in episode 2.01 of The Crown have been added to the gallery. We also recently added posters, stills, and on set photos from The Crown as well as new event and interview images and magazine scans. Enjoy all the new additions and look for more screencaps to be added soon.

GALLERY LINK:
2.01 Misadventure

Categories "The Crown" Articles

Claire Foy looks back on her reign as Queen Elizabeth II

By: Shirley Li

Claire Foy made Peter Morgan’s job easy. As Queen Elizabeth II on The Crown, the 33-year-old actress delivered a Golden Globe-winning performance the show’s creator says he depended on throughout the first two seasons of the Netflix period drama. “I don’t have to give her fireworks to make her feel like she’s the epicenter of everything,” he explains. “With Claire, you could push her in any direction. Her comic timing is good, her sense of tragedy is good…. No matter what we gave her to do, she would be able to do it, so that gave me enormous freedom as a writer.”

Though Foy departs the show along with the rest of its principal cast after season 2, she’s already scored her next role, as troubled hacker Lisbeth Salander in the Dragon Tattoo sequel The Girl in the Spider’s Web (slated for 2018). Here, she talks the end of her small-screen sovereignty. (Spoilers for The Crown season 2 ahead!)

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What was it like saying goodbye to Elizabeth during your final scene?
CLAIRE FOY: It was surreal. It’s very difficult to prepare yourself for that moment. Ultimately what you end up feeling is just sort of confused and that you need to go home and have a lie-down, really.

Season 2 delves deeper into examining Elizabeth’s restraint, even while those around her fail her. What was the key to tapping into that?
I think the moments when Elizabeth really becomes angry is when she’s lied to. She’s been very disappointed by the men in her life for their lack of endurance. She feels left out, and what makes her angry more than anything else in the world is the sense that people aren’t trying their best.
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Categories "The Crown" Articles

Interview with The Crown’s Claire Foy

By: Alexandra Pollard

Losing out on a Bafta for the second year in a row was, Claire Foy insists, one of the best moments of her career. She was up for best actress for her role as Elizabeth II in The Crown, and was widely expected to win – but the moment came, and it went to Happy Valley’s Sarah Lancashire instead. “Can I just say,” said Lancashire from the podium, “Claire Foy, you have given me the best 10 hours under a duvet that I’ve ever had.” For Foy, it was better than winning.

“That was, I’m telling you, one of the most ridiculous moments of my life,” she says, beaming. “I mean, I love her. I grew up watching her.” Foy is sitting opposite me, wearing a comfy-looking jumpsuit and scuffed Converse, her hair – now she no longer needs to adopt the Queen’s bouffant do – newly cropped short. “There’s nothing as amazing as a fellow actor saying you’re good.”

We meet a couple of days before Prince Harry and Meghan Markle announce their engagement, a relationship Foy has expressed approval of in the past (“I must speak for actresses,” she said, “We’re not a bad bunch. We’re all right”). She’d had nearly a decade of television roles – she first appeared on screen as a werewolf’s ex-fiancee in Being Human, then later starred in BBC dramas The Night Watch and Wolf Hall – but it was not until The Crown that, she says, people’s perception of her changed. The lavish Netflix series had an unprecedented £100m budget, but the show’s heart and soul was Foy’s compelling, devastating restraint as the young monarch. It is no easy task to play a woman whose main personality traits are, by necessity, detachment and composure, but with just the downward crease of a smile or the flicker of her enormous eyes, Foy hinted at the tumult rippling beneath the Queen’s steady surface.

There has been speculation over whether the royal family have seen The Crown – Foy finds it easier to imagine that they haven’t – but if they do gather round Netflix for season two, it might make for awkward viewing. Beginning in 1956, with the Suez crisis escalating and the British public starting to question the monarchy’s relevance, the season (which is Foy’s last; Olivia Colman will take up the mantle for the Queen’s later years) explores the parts of the royal story we are unlikely to see on a commemorative plate any time soon. We learn of the Nazi affiliations of Edward VIII, the sexual proclivities of Princess Margaret’s disdainful fiance Antony Armstrong-Jones, and – perhaps most shockingly – Prince Philip’s supposed infidelity.
Continue reading Interview with The Crown’s Claire Foy

Categories "Unsane" Articles Projects

Steven Soderbergh’s ‘Unsane’ Gets Spring Release

By: Anthony D’Alessandro

Bleecker Street’s second release with Steven Soderbergh, Unsane, will hit theaters on March 23. We hear that the pic will go wide. This is the thriller Soderbergh reportedly shot on his iPhone and which stars Claire Foy, Joshua Leonard, SNL alum Jay Pharaoh, Juno Temple, Aimee Mullins and Amy Irving.

New Regency has come aboard to take international rights on the film in all territories outside of the U.S. and will distribute it via 20th Century Fox International.

Jonathan Bernstein & James Greer wrote Unsane, which centers on a young woman (Foy) who is involuntarily committed to a mental institution where she is confronted by her greatest fear — but is it real or is it a product of her delusion?

Bleecker Street teamed with Soderbergh on the August release of his $29 million indie-budgeted Logan Lucky, which made $27.8M Stateside and close to $45M worldwide. The pic’s release was unique in that Soderbergh had oversight of its marketing campaign, which is unheard of for any other major studio.

Like Logan Lucky, Soderbergh is self-distributing Unsane through his Fingerprint Releasing via Bleecker Street.

The March 23 frame, the weekend prior to the gangbusters Easter B.O. frame, is a busy one with Paramount’s Sherlock Gnomes and Johnny Knoxville comedy Action Point opening as well as Open Road’s Midnight Sun with Bella Thorne and Patrick Schwarzenegger, Legendary/Universal’s Pacific Rim Uprising and Fox Searchlight’s Wes Anderson film Isle of Dogs in limited release.

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Categories "The Crown" Articles Projects

Claire Foy on the Second Season of ‘The Crown’, Going Blonde & Early Bedtimes

By: Lisa Armstrong

What happens to an actress once she has played the queen? Does some magisterial DNA rub off on her? Helen Mirren, Kristin Scott Thomas, Judi Dench have all been appointed dames. Only Cate Blanchett, who so magnificently illuminated Elizabeth II’s namesake, Elizabeth I, is yet to receive a title. But since she’s an Aussie and thus, technically, a subject of Her Majesty, there’s still a chance. Besides, Blanchett exudes innate queenliness.

“The role can give you quite a lot back if you let it,” says Peter Morgan, who should know, since he wrote not only The Crown (for TV) and The Audience (for the stage) but also The Queen, the 2006 movie that arguably restored the monarchy’s popularity following Princess Diana’s death. “When Helen was a guest of the Obamas at the White House Correspondents’ dinner,” says Morgan, “everyone else was being mercilessly teased, but the entire room stood up and cheered her. I’m not sure Helen didn’t grow two inches.”

The glow of imminent stardom flickers like Saturn’s rings around Claire Foy, who will be back as Elizabeth Regina in season two of The Crown next month. Directors from Steven Soderbergh and La La Land’s Damien Chazelle to Evil Dead’s Fede Alvarez have lined up to work with the prolific but previously little-known 33-year-old British actress. Far from being in character when we meet for chamomile tea at the chic London members’ club Quo Vadis, she is wearing tortoiseshell glasses, her blondish hair scraped back with visible roots—the remnants of her role in her recent movie Breathe, opposite Andrew Garfield—and a denim jumpsuit from Citizens of Humanity. (There’s no such thing as a bad jumpsuit day in Foy’s book; at the Emmys in September, she arrived in a silver-trimmed black version by Oscar de la Renta.) By the time you read this, she and her jumpsuits will have decamped to Atlanta to film Chazelle’s First Man, which traces America’s determination to get its man on the moon before the Soviets. Foy plays Neil Armstrong’s wife, Janet, opposite Ryan Gosling.
Continue reading Claire Foy on the Second Season of ‘The Crown’, Going Blonde & Early Bedtimes

Categories Articles

Claire Foy Loves Christmas and Cosmos (and We Love Her)

By: Melissa Goldberg

Best hidden talent
Rock-climbing, although I only tried it for the first time in August. I have a little girl, so I spend a lot of time at playgrounds, where there are tons of tiny climbing courses. Whenever I see one, a part of me goes, Come on, climb that wall! So this summer I went to an indoor rock-climbing gym, and I bloody loved it.

Best holiday tradition
In the Foy household, we put on Bruce Springsteen’s cover of “Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town” and dance around the living room. And now that I have my own home and family, I really love decorating the Christmas tree. I believe the more color, the better, so I just chuck everything on it.

Best splurge
My housecleaner. I’m actually good at cleaning, but now I can come home without asking myself why I haven’t done this or that.She organizes the cupboards and makes the beds—she’s changed my life. I’m in love with her.

Best advice
Thinking isn’t always the answer. Sometimes the best thing to do is listen to everything your heart, body, and soul are trying to tell you.

Best dream role
I’m still waiting for one to turn up! If you’re right for a role, it’ll come at the perfect time. And at some point, I hope to discover something beyond acting. Maybe I’ll be the oldest mountaineer ever to climb the Himalayas!

Best Cocktails
I guess I’m stuck in the 1990s, because I love a good cosmopolitan.

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