Categories "Breathe" "The Crown" "The Girl in the Spider’s Web" Articles

The Queen of the Small Screen Goes Big

By: Anne Marie Scanlon

From Tesco to the Tower and after two coronations, actress Claire Foy has never lost her head

As someone who studied history to post-graduate level, reads history books for fun and gobbles up historical fiction, I was beside myself with excitement when I heard the BBC was dramatising Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall, the Man Booker Award winner 2009.

Transferring beloved books onto both the big screen and the small is a notoriously tricky task but director Peter Kosminsky’s adaptation was a unanimous hit.

The casting was superb throughout – from the bit players to Mark Rylance as Cromwell and Damien Lewis as Henry VIII.

To my mind though, Claire Foy, who I had never heard of at the time, stole the show as a magnificent, complicated, wholly credible, Anne Boleyn.
Wolf Hall won many awards and although Foy was nominated for several she didn’t get one gong, when really she should have won ALL the awards.

In person Foy is nothing like Anne Boleyn (probably a good thing), she’s petite and bears a passing resemblance to Henry’s second ill-fated wife, but that’s it. The actress tells me that she was as excited as I was when she heard that Wolf Hall was being made into a TV series (we both agree that Hilary Mantel is a “genius”.)
Continue reading The Queen of the Small Screen Goes Big

Categories "The Crown" Articles

How ‘The Crown’ Revived Our Love for the Queen

By: Marion Van Renterghem

The Queen is all secrets, mystery and muffled noise – ostensible blandness and unwavering tradition. Guests of Buckingham Palace must observe the golden rule: talk of politics, religion or gender is forbidden. “It limits conversational scope,” says Belgian journalist Marc Roche, a biographer of the Queen. Roche is almost the only reporter on the planet to have access to the press-fearing Windsors – a much-coveted privilege. A longtime London correspondent for French newspaper Le Monde, he has met the Queen six times. “Each time, she asked me the same three questions,” he says. “How long have you been in the UK? Do you like it? Isn’t it a wonderful place?” Once, she added a fourth. “Do you like my paintings?” A Rembrandt and a Rubens were hanging within arm’s reach, Roche recalls. “They are marvellous, Ma’am,” he replied. “Aren’t they just? My great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria bought them,” she said, before slipping away with small, hurried steps to speak to another guest.

Something unprecedented has happened to the Queen of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In the Netflix series The Crown, she has become the heroine in a pacey and lavish account of her life, beginning with the final years of her father, George VI, the stammering king. Played by Claire Foy, Elizabeth II is the new star of the American video-streaming platform, which recently topped 100 million subscribers. This year, this blockbuster-budget American-British series took home two prestigious Golden Globes: Best Drama Series and Best Actress for Foy. The ten episodes of The Crown’s first series were released across ten countries simultaneously and critics were universal in their praise. Although Netflix keeps its audience figures close to its chest, its hurry to announce a second series, expected this November, confirms The Crown as a global success.

Read the full article here on GQ.

Categories "The Girl in the Spider’s Web" Articles

Sylvia Hoeks Joins ‘The Girl In The Spider’s Web’

By: James White

She enjoyed a big break recently as Luv in Blade Runner 2049 and now Sylvia Hoeks is scoring more roles. She’s just joined the cast of The Girl In The Spider’s Web.

Fede Alvarez is directing the film, which adapts the latest Lisbeth Salander novel, albeit not one written by original author Stieg Larsson. Penned instead by David Lagercrantz with continuity to both Larsson’s writing style and his characters in mind, The Girl In The Spider’s Web sends The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’s odd-couple pairing of hacker Salander and seasoned journo Mikael Blomkvist on new misadventures. This time they’re faced with a ruthless web of espionage, cybercriminals and high-level villainy, plus the usual serious threats. Alvarez has worked on the latest draft with Jay Basu, itself based on contributions from Steve Knight.

Claire Foy is playing Salander, but Hoeks is still in talks and there are no details on which character she might be taking on. Alvarez is scheduled to start shooting in Berlin and Stockholm this coming January.

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Categories "Breathe" Articles

John Cavendish on ‘Breathe’

By: John Cavendish

Travelling with my father, Robin Cavendish, was not straightforward. He had contracted polio in 1958, just before I was born, and was completely paralysed from the neck down.

He was entirely dependent on a breathing machine fitted to a wheelchair, built by his great friend and Oxford professor Teddy Hall, which pumped air into his lungs.

Dad had also supervised the design of a Dormobile van with a hydraulic lift, so he could travel. He decided he wanted to see the sun set over the Mediterranean, so off we went to Spain. I was seven and it was my first holiday abroad.

Disaster struck just outside Barcelona. My uncle Bloggs (named after Henry Blogg, the most decorated lifeboat man in RNLI history), my mother’s brother and not the most practical of men, plugged a cable for Dad’s breathing machine into the wrong socket. There was a loud explosion, flames and smoke, and both van and breathing machine ground to a halt.
Continue reading John Cavendish on ‘Breathe’

Categories Articles

Claire Foy on Being a Working Mum & More

By: Mick Brown

In her roles as Queen Elizabeth II and Anne Boleyn, Claire Foy has demonstrated a quiet genius for conveying a multitude of emotions and thoughts without saying a word. It is all there in the face: porcelain pale, with perfect features and those startled-wide eyes.

The pauses, the almost imperceptible shifts in expression; the steely, basilisk gaze. It is hard to take your eyes off her. It is something she shares with Mark Rylance – whom she acted opposite in Wolf Hall – and which is rooted in a particular ability that may not be immediately apparent to the average viewer.

‘The one thing they do better than any other actor that I know is listen,’ says the director of Wolf Hall, Peter Kosminsky. ‘In real life you don’t know what the person you’re talking to is going to say next, so we listen very carefully, not least because we have to work out what our next remark should be.

Read the full article here on The Telegraph.

Categories Gallery Public Events

Gallery Update: October 2017 Event & Interview Additions

New photos of Claire at events and interviews from this past week have been added to the gallery. Enjoy!

GALLERY LINKS:
Public Events > “Breathe” Special Screening – October 9, 2017
Public Events > “Breathe” Special Screening After Party – October 9, 2017
Public Events > SiriusXM Studios – October 11, 2017
Public Events > AOL Build – October 11, 2017
Public Events > Leaving AOL Build – October 11, 2017
Interviews > SiriusXM Studios – October 11, 2017
Interviews > AOL Build – October 11, 2017

Categories Gallery Public Events

Gallery Update: October 2017 Event Additions

New photos of Claire at events held in London and Zurich have been added to the gallery. Enjoy the new additions!

GALLERY LINKS:
61st BFI London Film Festival: “Breathe” Photocall – October 4, 2017
61st BFI London Film Festival: “Breathe” Press Conference – October 4, 2017
61st BFI London Film Festival: “Breathe” Premiere – October 4, 2017
The Contenders London – October 6, 2017
13th Zurich Film Festival: “Breathe” Premiere – October 6, 2017
13th Zurich Film Festival: Tommy Hilfiger VIP Dinner – October 6, 2017

Categories "Breathe" Articles Projects Videos

Deadline ‘Breathe’ Review

By: Pete Hammond

Andy Serkis might be best known as Caesar in the Planet of the Apes reboot films or Gollum in the Lord of the Rings franchise, but he’s about to surprise the world with his ability behind the scenes in a very different kind of movie.

Serkis makes his directorial debut with Breathe, the true story of Robin Cavendish, who became tethered to a breathing machine in order to stay alive after contracting polio in 1958 at age 28. With his wife Diana driving him to keep a will to live, he went on with his life and family for several decades after first being told he wouldn’t last a year. This is definitely not the kind of material we have associated the clearly multi-talented Serkis with in the past, but he does the Cavendish story proud in a movie that gives us hope for the human spirit, an inspiring and beautiful film that blissfully avoids the clichés of a genre that can get maudlin and sappy very quickly.

As I say in my video review (click the link above to watch), a better comparison for Breathe is 2014’s The Theory of Everything, with Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones as Stephen and Jane Hawkins as they struggle to rise above Hawking’s debilitating condition. That’s what Cavendish does as well with the unstoppable optimism of his wife. As played by Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy, we have another pair of actors in a heart-wrenching drama that deserve strong awards consideration.
Continue reading Deadline ‘Breathe’ Review

Categories "The Girl in the Spider’s Web" Articles

Claire Foy Breaks Her Silence On Playing Lisbeth Salander

By: Ben Barna

Last month, it was announced that Claire Foy would be playing everyone’s favorite Swedish cyberpunk Lisbeth Salander in the upcoming adaptation of The Girl in the Spider’s Web. Landing the coveted role caps off a breakout year for the 33-year-old-British actress, a year in which she also won a Golden Globe for her role as Queen Elizabeth II in Netflix’s popular drama The Crown. This morning, Foy was in New York promoting her new romantic drama Breathe, opposite Andrew Garfield, but was more than willing to discuss how she is approaching a role that was last played by Rooney Mara in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, and Noomi Rapace before her.

You’re taking on this iconic role that was portrayed by two other actresses. Do you completely throw those out the window?
I watched them before it was even a twinkle in my eye that I’d be doing this. So I can’t throw that away because I loved those performances and I loved watching them, so I don’t want to. I trained in theater, and if you train in theater, you’re aware that if you play a Shakespeare part, a hundred thousand other women played that part. I don’t really buy that idea. I think the idea with Lisbeth Salander is that she keeps going. It’s sort of like James Bond in the sense that she does keep going. You know it could be a complete disaster, and I’m not Rooney Mara, as much as I would like to be.

Do you have any idea what your look is going to be for the character?
No, I mean it’s my decision, quite frankly. I’m not going play a part where I’m told how to look because that’s weird. I think for me and Fede [Alvarez], the director, our main goal is to start from scratch and not assume anything, not assume that because that’s an iconic image, that therefore that is how I have to look and how I have to be, because I think you’ve got to honor the books, but this is the David Lagercrantz version—it’s a reinvention of the story. And that doesn’t mean we’re going to go mental and start doing all sorts of weird things, but, as with any characters that I build, it has to be from the ground up. It’s got to make sense, it’s got to come from where she is in her life there. Time has moved on, she’s changed, she’s a different woman. She’s been through so many things.

Is she older?
She’s slightly older, yeah. I don’t think it’s actually set because she’s supposed to be timeless. I don’t think she’s 33, which is my age. I’m pretty sure she’s not. If she was, it’d be a whole other story line with aging and wrinkles.

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Categories Articles Gallery

Claire Foy Covers the November 2017 Issue of Vogue UK

By: Scarlett Conlon

SHE is set to steal the show alongside Andrew Garfield in the forthcoming Breathe (the cinematic adaptation of the love story of tireless campaigners Robin and Diana Cavendish), but before then Claire Foy – the toast of the British acting scene thanks to her Golden Globe-winning turn as Queen Elizabeth in The Crown – takes to the cover of the November issue of British Vogue.

Making her debut fronting the fashion bible, Foy is resplendent in a floor-sweeping Christian Siriano gown, hailing “the return of glamour”. Styled by senior contributing fashion editor Kate Phelan and photographed by Craig McDean, the 33-year-old is interviewed by Chloe Fox for the accompanying interview in which she sheds light on finding global recognition at the right time in her life: “If this had happened to me when I was 23, I probably would have spun into a vortex,” she reveals.

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Categories "The Girl in the Spider’s Web" Articles Projects

Claire Foy is Officially the New Lisbeth Salander

By: Zack Sharf

The search for the new Lisbeth Salander is over. “The Crown” breakout Claire Foy has officially been chosen to step into the role of Stieg Larsson iconic computer hacker for the upcoming “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” adaptation. The character has been played on the big screen by both Noomi Rapace and Rooney Mara in the past. Fede Alvarez, best known for horror films “Evil Dead” and “Don’t Breathe,” is directing.

“I couldn’t be more thrilled about Claire taking the reins of the iconic Lisbeth Salander,” Alvarez said in an official statement. “Claire is an incredible, rare talent who will inject a new and exciting life into Lisbeth. I can’t wait to bring this new story to a worldwide audience, with Claire Foy at its center.”

Foy is having a breakout year. Her role in Netflix’s “The Crown” landed her an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series, and she’s also the lead opposite Andrew Garfield in Andy Serkis’ directorial debut “Breathe,” in theaters this October. Foy’s role as Elizabeth II in “The Crown” has already won her ta Golden Globe Award and a Screen Actors Guild Award.

Sony Pictures will release “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” in theaters October 19, 2018.

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