Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles Gallery

Royal Flush: The Women of Wolf Hall

Hilary Mantel’s triumphant Tudor novels enjoy a new life on stage and screen

By Sophie Elmhirst

In some ways, it was an accident. A few years ago, Hilary Mantel signed a contract with her publisher for two books: a modern novel set in Africa, and a Tudor novel set in the court of Henry VIII. ‘Theoretically, I was working on the African novel,’ she recalls, ‘and I thought I’d take a day off and play.’ Mantel wrote a line of dialogue and wanted to laugh with delight. She’d got it. She’d got him. Not Henry, but Thomas Cromwell, the King’s adviser and her leading man. There was his voice, clear on the page: his cool, all-seeing gaze. She was off. ‘I had to say to my publisher, “You won’t get that novel, but you will get this one, if you don’t mind.”’ They didn’t mind.

The beginning was an experiment, but the book had been long in the works. Mantel’s Cromwell novels are born of deep, marathon reading. She is as meticulous in her research as she is free and daring in her writing. The facts are rock-hard; the fiction elaborate. I first met her two years ago, on the day the second volume, Bring Up the Bodies, was published. It was already clear that something extraordinary was happening. Wolf Hall had been a hit, won the Booker, sold handsomely, and here she was with Bring Up the Bodies – the most intelligent political thriller you will ever lose a week to – nominated once more. Grateful as she was for the attention and praise, Mantel was impatient to get on with the next volume. Next year, she said, meaning 2013, was to be ‘uninterrupted’, devoted to writing.

It didn’t quite work out that way. A few weeks after we met, Mantel won the Booker for the second time: the first woman, and the first British writer, to do so. There was to be a play, a television adaptation. She was in constant demand. Two years later, the pace has barely slowed. The play, a sell-out hit for the RSC in Stratford and the West End, transfers to Broadway in the spring. The six-part, richly financed BBC production – with Damian Lewis as Henry, Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn, Mark Rylance as Cromwell – is soon to air. Her publisher, 4th Estate, gave me the latest figures: almost 1.5 million copies of Wolf Hall and just about a million copies of Bring Up the Bodies sold in the UK and the Commonwealth. The books have been published in 36 countries. Mantel has become an industry. Continue reading Royal Flush: The Women of Wolf Hall

Categories "Rosewater" Gallery

Rosewater (2014) > Blu-ray Screencaptures

Rosewater is based on The New York Times best-selling memoir “Then They Came for Me: A Family’s Story of Love, Captivity, and Survival,” written by Maziar Bahari. The film marks the directorial debut of “The Daily Show” host Jon Stewart, and stars Gael García Bernal. Rosewater follows the Tehran-born Bahari, a broadcast journalist with Canadian citizenship. In June 2009, Bahari returned to Iran to interview Mir-Hossein Mousavi, who was the prime challenger to president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. As Mousavi’s supporters rose up to protest Ahmadinejad’s victory declaration hours before the polls closed, Bahari endured personal risk by sending footage of the street riots to the BBC. Bahari was arrested by police, led by a man identifying himself only as “Rosewater,” who tortured and interrogated him over the next 118 days. With Bahari’s pregnant wife, Paola (Claire Foy), leading an international campaign to have her husband freed, and Western media outlets keeping the story alive, Iranian authorities released Bahari on $300,000 bail and the promise he would act as a spy for the government.

GALLERY LINK:
– Movies & Television > Rosewater (2014) > Blu-ray Screencaptures

Thanks to Stef for the Blu-ray Screencaptures.

Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles Gallery

Wolf Hall – On Set with… Claire Foy – Daily Mail Weekend Scans

Claire, 30, who made her name in the title role of the BBC’s Little Dorrit in 2008, plays Anne Boleyn in BBC2’s epic Tudor drama Wolf Hall, based on Hilary Mantel’s books. Here she takes us behind the scenes on the series, which was filmed at historic locations across Britain.

Thanks to Chuckie for the scans.

Categories "Little Dorrit" "The Great War: The People's Story" Gallery

“The Great War: The People’s Story”, “Little Dorrit” and “Going Postal Gallery Updates

Mia has been updating our gallery with new old goodies. Check them out!



GALLERY LINKS:

– Movies & Television > The Great War: The People’s Story (TV, 2014) > Episode 4
– Movies & Television > Little Dorrit (TV, 2008) > Production Stills
– Movies & Television > Little Dorrit (TV, 2008) > Promotion
– Movies & Television > Going Postal (TV, 2010) > Promotion

Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles Gallery

Radio Times – January 31, 2015 (Scans) – Claire Foy Interview – Wolf Hall

Claire Foy is breathing new life into Anne Boleyn, the greatest ruler England never had…

Better than Henry — If Anne Boleyn had been born a man, she’d have made an extraordinary ruler, says Wolf Hall star Claire Foy.

Adapted from Hilary Mantel’s Man Booker Prize-winning novels, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, BBC2’s six-part series is a finaly nuanced interpretation of historical events.

“All the facts are incredibly well researched,” says Foy, “but Hilary has written Anne as Thomas Cromwell would observe her. And that’s not particularly easy for an actor, because you can’t play what people see in their mind as opposed to what is actually going on.”

Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles Gallery

Hot TV (Scans) – Mark Rylance stars as Thomas Cromwell in Wolf Hall

Right-Hand Man — Mark Rylance stars as Thomas Cromwell in an epic new drama.

Looking for something to get your teeth into this month? Well, you’re in luck, because a major adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize-winning novels arrives on BBC2 this week and it’s a real animal.