Categories "Breathe" "First Man" "The Crown" Articles

Claire Foy, From ‘Crown’ Jewels To Golden Globe And Beyond

by Damon Wise

Inspired by UK playwright Peter Morgan’s critically acclaimed 2013 play The Audience—which enjoyed a brief but successful Broadway run in 2015—The Crown proved a surprise hit for Netflix when the series debuted in November of last year. Starting with the marriage of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II to Prince Philip in 1947, a scant few years before her coronation at the age of 25 in 1952, the 10-part first season served as an origin story for the world’s longest reigning monarch.

It also offered an introduction to actress Claire Foy, who—along with co-stars John Lithgow, as Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Matt Smith, as her husband Prince Philip—received glowing reviews for her performance, which earned her a Golden Globe just over two months after Season 1 aired. In December, the story will continue, acquainting Her Majesty with dangerous affairs in the Middle East and a more embarrassing scandal closer to home.

How did this part come to you?

It started the usual way – I got sent the script. It was slightly tempered by the fact that I was five months pregnant at the time [in the fall of 2014]. So when my agent mentioned it, I was like, “Do you really think I want to have a three-month-old baby and do a nine-month TV series while I play The Queen of England? Are you insane?” [laughs] So I was reticent about it. But my agent said, ‘They just want to talk to you.”

So I went, and it was nice, and they said, “Would you mind coming back and maybe doing a test?” I thought I’d have to go to LA, because it was Netflix, so I said, “Well, that’s not going to happen, because I can’t fly anymore,” but they said, “No, we can do it in London.” So I went back, and Stephen Daldry and I went over a few different scenes. Then they said, “Do you want to do it?” So it was a bit of an odd experience because at no point did I really consider it a serious possibility. And at no point did I really think that I would be who they were looking for.

What were they looking for in your audition? Were they looking for somebody with a strong resemblance to The Queen?

No. Well, we did do a costume fitting, but obviously, with a giant baby bump it was hilarious, because I was wearing a gown and a wig and a crown—I looked like a pregnant toddler. I think, knowing them now, they just wanted someone to discover [the part] with. It was very open. Maybe because I was pregnant, I was just very relaxed. Then, in November, they told me that I’d got it, and we started shooting in the July the following year. We knew that it was commissioned for two series from the off, and that we’d shoot all 10 episodes in one fell swoop. There was going to be no pilot.

What kind of research did you do?

Oh God. I can’t really remember. I think I did what I usually do, which is to buy thousands of documentaries and watch them all, because you can pretend it’s work. And then I got loads of books and read them. Actually, I had a very long time to get used to the idea of playing the Queen. I’ve never really had that before, actually—that expanse of time to get into character. Then we started working with a voice coach, William Conacher, who’s a genius—we couldn’t have made The Crown without him. It all happened very slowly, which was probably a benefit. There was no pressure to make any sudden, mad choices. Continue reading Claire Foy, From ‘Crown’ Jewels To Golden Globe And Beyond

Categories "Breathe" News / Rumors

Hamptons Film Festival: Andy Serkis’ ‘Breathe’ Among First Pics In Lineup

Andy Serkis’ directorial debut Breathe, the period drama starring Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy, has been tapped as the Centerpiece film at this year’s Hamptons Film Festival. The fest, celebrating its 25th anniversary, runs October 5-9 in East Hampton, NY and this morning took the covers off the first part of its lineup. Its the U.S. premiere for Breathe, which will have its world bow October 4 as the opening-night film of the London Film Festival.

Breathe tells the true story about the adventurous and charismatic Robin Cavendish (Garfield), who has his whole life ahead of him when he is paralyzed by polio at age 28 and given just months to live. Against all advice, his wife Diana (Foy) brings him home from the hospital and with devotion and witty determination encourages him to lead a long and fulfilled life. William Nicholson penned the script, and the film will play on Sunday, October 8 as the Sunday Centerpiece with Serkis scheduled to be in attendance.

Fest passes go on sale September 5.

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Categories "Breathe" Videos

Breathe Trailer

Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy Star in a Tale of Love and Polio

The trailer for Breathe plays itself at first like a jaunty period romantic comedy — the type of particularly English comedy of manners we’ve all seen before. “I could ask you to dance, and you could say ‘Well, I don’t feel like dancing,'” says a suit-clad Andrew Garfield. “And I could say, ‘Well, maybe some other time.”

“Or I could just not ask,” he tells Claire Foy, doing her best bashful brit in a ballgown. He grabs her by the hand, and off to the dance floor and a subsequent whirlwind romance they go. They even go for a drive in one of those newfangled automobiles, as people in the ’50s loved to do.

Then comes the almost expected beat where her family doesn’t approve of the courtship. Foy’s character father protests that she hardly even knows the man, and she replies, “The thing is, I just know this is it.”

It’s all very expected and familiar, until, of course, we’re all reminded why people who say “Oh, I was born in the wrong time period. I just wish I could live back then” are completely misguided.

That thing, in this case, is polio. Garfield’s character contracts a nasty strain of the then incurable disease and is relegated to spend the rest of his life in a wheelchair, which totally leaves us with a completely different movie than the first 45 seconds of the trailer had set us up for.

The film is actually based on the real life story of Robin Cavendish, a British tea broker who was paralyzed from the neck down at the age of 28 and set out to become both an advocate and example for the disabled. Initially given just three months to live and told he would never leave the hospital again due to his need to be hooked up to a breathing device at all times, Cavendish sought more and pushed for medical advances that would help him live a fuller life. He went on to travel wildly, remained a devoted husband and father, and picked up an Order of the British Empire along the way.

Garfield takes the part fresh off his first Academy Award nomination, and clearly hopes to keep his string of challenging roles going. Foy meanwhile finds herself as a big screen leading lady for only the second time after 2011’s Wreckers, and the first after her breakthrough role as a young Queen Elizabeth in The Crown.

The film will also mark the directorial debut of Andy Serkis, yes the actor best known for his performance captures roles like Gollum in The Lord of the Rings saga (Serkis actually oversaw filming of Jungle Book before directing Breathe, but the former CGI-heavy film won’t be released until next year).

Breathe is scheduled to open the BFI London Film Festival on October 4th, and then hit select theaters later that month.

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Categories "Breathe" "The Crown" Gallery Public Events

Gallery Update: Scans Update & SAG Awards Additions

GALLERY LINKS:
23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards
Magazine Scans > Scans from 2017 > MMM Magazine – February 2017
Public Events > Events in 2017 > 23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (Screencaptures)
Interviews/News Segments > E! | 23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (Screencaptures)
Public Events > Events in 2017 > 23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards Weinstein Company & Netflix After Party
Photoshoots > 23rd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (2017)
Movies & Television > Breathe (2017) > Posters & Covers

Categories "Breathe" "The Crown" Articles

Claire Foy On Playing the Young Queen Elizabeth, Raising a Newborn, and Having More Fun as a Blonde

By Jason Chen

If you’ve watched even just an episode or two of Netflix’s The Crown, you’ve likely already fallen under its spell — lush sets, elaborate costumes, stunning cinematography (it’s rumored to be one of the most expensive shows ever produced), but what gives the show its pathos is lead actress Claire Foy, who portrays the first days of Queen Elizabeth with a performance that ranges from naïve to steely to circumspect — often all in the same scene.

Yahoo Style: How did the role come your way?

Claire Foy: Just in the classic way, actually. I just auditioned for it. My agent rang me up and asked, “Do you want to go on a meet?” Of course, at the time I didn’t realize I’d be meeting [director] Stephen Daldry, [writer] Peter Morgan, and Andy Harris, the producer. They’re all quite big wigs. That was a bit scary, but it was just a really lovely chat. I had no expectations of getting it or anything, so I think I was really quite relaxed. It was just really lovely. Then I had a second audition, and then found out that I’d got it, which was a real shock. Really exciting.

How familiar were you with the Queen’s early years?

I think everybody in England and around the world is familiar with her because she’s been around for my entire life — our generation has grown up with her there as a prominent figure. But I wasn’t aware of her as a young mother or anything like that. Obviously, I knew everything about Edward the 8th and the abdication of the throne, and the fact she wasn’t destined to be Queen, but that’s what happened. Her life could’ve been very, very different. I didn’t really know anything about the death of her father and how unexpected it was.

How did you find yourself inhabiting that state of mind?

I think Peter’s scripts are amazing and they do all the work for you, really. Also, I think if you’re grieving or you’re in massive amounts of shock, I think you just take every day as it comes. I don’t think as a character she could’ve thought about the magnitude of what was happening to her and the job that she was taking on and how that would change her life. I think she would’ve had a breakdown. She so obviously didn’t, in public anyway.

Would you say that was the most challenging part of the production?

I had a newborn baby, so-

Oh, my gosh. Congratulations.

Thanks very much. That was quite challenging. Amazing but challenging. It was also one of the biggest jobs I’d done, and there was a lot to get right. It wasn’t just about having an emotional connection to it. It was also about getting the physicality and the voice, and all those things that come with a character, so there was a lot of homework to do as well in order to, when you were on set, be able to be relaxed and just play the scene naturally. It took quite a lot of inhabiting to get to the point where you’re comfortable with that.

Did you work with a coach who helped you do those things?

Yes. William Conacher, who’s the best dialect coach in the world because he didn’t ever say to us, “This is how she sounds. You’ve got to do it.” We all found our collective sounds, which I think is really important, but we also found ourselves in the voices. It wasn’t like we were trying to do an impression because otherwise we’re trying to be perfect the entire time. You’re not going to be able to play a scene, so he was just amazing at giving us little ways in and funny little physical things that distract you from your voice and you end up doing it anyway.

Obviously the Queen has been portrayed on film and in theater numerous times already. Did you feel any pressure from that?

No. Those performances matter because they’re amazing, but I tried not to let them affect me. I watched The Queen very early on, mainly just because it’s a really good film, and I could pretend I was doing research, but luckily, the pressure was off in that way because I was playing her younger and there’s not that much footage or accounts of her when she’s at that age. The pressure to be an identical version of her, I didn’t really feel that so much. I didn’t go and see the play. I would’ve loved to but I just think it would’ve terrified me, if I’d have gone to go and watch those two amazing women do it. I would’ve probably not been able to do the job.

That pressure would be too great! Continue reading Claire Foy On Playing the Young Queen Elizabeth, Raising a Newborn, and Having More Fun as a Blonde

Categories "Breathe" News / Rumors

Andrew Garfield, Claire Foy Join Andy Serkis’ ‘Breathe’

LONDON — “The Amazing Spider-Man” star Andrew Garfield and Claire Foy, who plays “Queen Elizabeth II” in Netflix series “The Crown,” have joined director Andy Serkis’ true love story “Breathe.” The screenplay is written by William Nicholson, who was Oscar nominated for “Gladiator” and “Shadowlands.”

The film is produced by Jonathan Cavendish (“Bridget Jones’s Diary”) and The Imaginarium Studios. Embankment is handling worldwide sales. CAA and Embankment represent the producer for the U.S. sale. The film will be co-financed by BBC Films.

Garfield plays Robin, who is “handsome, brilliant and adventurous.” He is a man with his whole life ahead of him before he is “cruelly paralysed by polio.” Foy will star as Robin’s wife Diana, whose devotion and determination “transcend his disability.” “Together they refuse to be imprisoned by his suffering, travelling the world and transforming the lives of others with their humor, courage and lust for life. A heart-warming and hilarious celebration of bravery and human possibility; a love story about living every breath as though it’s your last.”

Cavendish commented: “Andy is the perfect choice to direct ‘Breathe.’ He is a visionary director with a superb take on this unusual and uplifting material. And above all, he is a superb director of actors.”

Serkis added: “I’m very excited by the prospect of working with Andrew. He is a remarkably gifted actor, capable of finding and expressing the deep emotions experienced by Robin, in spite of his disability. Claire is blessed with a diverse and exceptional range of work and is one of the U.K.’s most respected young actresses — she’s the perfect emotional foil to Andrew’s Robin and brings great strength of character to the pivotal role of Diana.”

The Crown,” which is written by Peter Morgan and is directed by Stephen Daldry, premieres on Netflix in November.

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