Categories "Wolf Hall" News / Rumors

The BAFTA TV Award for Leading Actor goes to the incredible Mark Rylance

“We’re a nation of storytellers. Long may that live” Wonderful words frm Mark Rylance on his 2nd BAFTA win this year.

Oscar winner Mark Rylance won another award at the House of Fraser British Academy Television Awards on Sunday, where he was named the best actor in a dramatic television series for “Wolf Hall.”

“Wolf Hall” was also named the best drama series, “Peter Kay’s Car Share” won for scripted comedy series and “This Is England ’90” won for best miniseries.

Acting awards went to Rylance, Suranne Jones for “Doctor Foster,” Tom Courtenay for “Unforgotten,” Chanel Cresswell for “This is England ’90,” Peter Kay for “Peter Kay’s Car Share,” Michaela Coel for “Chewing Gum”and Leigh Francis for “Celebrity Juice.”

“Wolf Hall” went into the show as the most-nominated show; it, “This Is England ’90” and “Peter Kay’s Car Share” were the only programs to win more than one award.

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Categories "Wolf Hall" News / Rumors

Wolf Hall wins best drama BAFTA

Wolf Hall director Peter Kosminsky uses his acceptance speech to defend the independence of the BBC BAFTA TV Awards. Kosminsky triggers ovation protest at Government threats to BBC and Channel4: don’t cut it BBC!

By Sarah Doran
Sunday 8 May 2016 at 7:50PM

Wolf Hall director Peter Kosminksy launched a passionate defence of the BBC when he took to the Bafta TV Awards stage to accept the award for Best British Drama this evening.

“In a week John Whittigdale described the disappearance of the BBC as ‘a tempting prospect’, I’d like to say a few words in defence of that organisation,” Kosminsky said on stage in London.

The director of the Bafta-winning BBC2 drama said that it was time for viewers to “stand up and fight” for the public broadcaster against what he saw as the government’s “dangerous nonsense.”

The government’s White Paper on the future of the BBC is due to be published this month, examining the next BBC charter and the scope of the BBC’s remit.

“I think most people would agree that the BBC’s main job is to speak truth to power, to report to the British public without fear or favour,” Kosminsky said. “It’s a public broadcaster independent of government, not a state broadcaster. All of this is under threat right now.”

“The Secretary of State has talked about putting six government nominees on to the editorial board of the BBC,” he continued. “And as a sign of things to come, the Secretary of State has been telling the BBC when to schedule its main news bulletin, what programmes it should make, and what programmes it shouldn’t make. It’s not something I thought I’d see in my lifetime in this country.”

Kosminsky went on to compare the situation to that of North Korea or Russia, and argued that Channel 4 was also under threat, telling the audience that government suggestions of privatisation would “eviscerate” the broadcaster.

“This is really scary stuff folks, and do you know what? It’s not their BBC, it’s your BBC. In many ways our broadcasting – the BBC and Channel 4 – is the envy of the world and we should stand up and fight for it, not let it go by default, and if we don’t, blink and it’ll be gone. No more Wolf Halls, no more Dispatches,” he said.

“It’s time for us to stand up and say no to this dangerous nonsense,” he ended.

The audience responded with a standing ovation for the Wolf Hall director.

After leaving the stage, the director said in the Bafta press conference that “without the BBC Wold Hall would not have been made.” Wolf Hall’s leading actor Mark Rylance backed up his director’s speech, saying, “I agree with them completely. I’ve made wonderful work with the BBC.”

Last week the Department for Culture, Media and Sport agreed to take into consideration the views of 9,000 Radio Times readers which it had previously ignored during the consultation stage.

Radio Times editor Ben Preston said at the time, “Soon we’ll discover whether the Culture Secretary has actually listened to your overwhelming support for an independent public service broadcaster supported by the licence fee. Watch this space.”

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Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles

Last laugh for Wolf Hall as it wins best lighting Bafta nomination

Wolf Hall is up for best photography and lighting at the Bafta television craft awards, despite a row over gloomy scenes

By Hannah Furness, Arts Correspondent

The makers of Wolf Hall have had the last laugh in the debate over their use of authentic candles in filming, as they are nominated for best lighting at the Bafta Television Craft Awards.

Gavin Finney was nominated for best photography and lighting for the BBC period drama, going up against The Frankenstein Chronicles, Fortitude and London Spy.

The nomination will be a moment of jubilation for the team, after the drama, broadcast last year, was initially blighted by audience complaints about its lighting. Continue reading Last laugh for Wolf Hall as it wins best lighting Bafta nomination

Categories "Wolf Hall" News / Rumors

Claire Foy nominated for Best Actress at the Royal Television Society Awards

The nominations for the Royal Television Society Awards 2016 have been announced and there’s no room for Mark Rylance’s Emmy and Golden Globe-winning portrayal of Thomas Cromwell in the BBC’s Wolf Hall.

Claire Foy, who played the part of Anne Boleyn in the adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s historical novels, has however been nominated for Best Actress alongside Suranne Jones, for Doctor Foster, and Claire Rushbrook, for Home Fires. Somewhat surprisingly Nicola Walker, whose performances in both ITV’s Unforgotten and the BBC’s River gathered her rave reviews last autumn, has not been nominated.

As for Rylance, he will have to make do with the Oscar he recently scooped for Bridge of Spies, as Adam Long, Anthony Hopkins and Tom Courtenay fill the nominations for Best Actor. This is England ’90 and The Lost Honour of Christopher Jefferies, both of which have also got nominations for Best Drama Writer, will vie with Wolf Hall for Best Drama Serial. Humans, No Offence and The Last Kingdom are all up for Best Drama Series.

Catastrophe, Peter Kay’s Car Share and Chewing Gum dominate the comedy nominations, with each sitcom picking up three nominations. It’s a particularly good year for Michaela Coel who has Best Comedy Performance and Best Comedy Writing nominations to along with her recognition in the Breakthrough category.

The winners will be announced at a ceremony on Tuesday 22 March.

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Categories "Rosewater" "The Crown" "Wolf Hall" Articles Gallery

“Rosewater” Posters & Still, “The Crown” Stills & French language article on “Wolf Hall”

GALLERY LINKS:
– Movies & Television > Rosewater (2014) > Posters & Covers
– Movies & Television > Rosewater (2014) > Production Stills
– Movies & Television > The Crown (TV Series, 2016) > Production Stills
– Magazine Scans > Scans from 2016 > Studio Ciné Live (France) – January/February 2016

Categories "Wolf Hall"

“Wolf Hall” wins best limited series at the Golden Globes!!!

Congrats to everyone involved in the making of this marvellous series!!!

Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn, Mark Rylance as Thomas Cromwell.

Follow the meteoric rise of a man who becomes King Henry VIII’s closest advisor. Tony® Award-winning actor Mark Rylance (Twelfth Night) and Emmy® and Golden Globe® Award-winner Damian Lewis (Homeland) star in the miniseries adapted from Hilary Mantel’s best-selling Booker Prize-winning novels: Wolf Hall and its sequel, Bring Up the Bodies. Mark Rylance is Thomas Cromwell, a brutal blacksmith’s son who rises from the ashes of personal disaster, and deftly picks his way through a court where ‘man is wolf to man.’ Damian Lewis is King Henry VIII, obsessed with protecting the Tudor dynasty by securing his succession with a male heir to the throne. Told from Cromwell’s perspective, Wolf Hall follows the complex machinations and back room dealings of this pragmatic and accomplished power broker who must serve king and country while dealing with deadly political intrigue, Henry VIII’s tempestuous relationship with Anne Boleyn (Claire Foy, Little Dorrit), and the religious upheavals of the Protestant reformation.

Order Wolf Hall from Amazon.com (DVD & Blu-ray) or Amazon.co.uk now (DVD & Blu-ray)! 😉

Categories "Wolf Hall" News / Rumors

ARTE diffuse la série “Wolf Hall – Dans l’ombre des Tudors”

ARTE diffuse la série “Wolf Hall – Dans l’ombre des Tudors” les 21 et 28 janvier.

Publié par Pascal 25/12

Dans la série en six épisodes Wolf Hall, Peter Kosminsky retrace l’ascension fulgurante de Thomas Cromwell, éminence grise du roi d’Angleterre Henri VIII.

Adaptée des best sellers de Hilary Mantel, une fresque historique aussi sobre que passionnante dopée par l’interprétation de Mark Rylance, Damian Lewis, Claire Foy ou encore Jonathan Pryce.

Episodes 1 à 3 le jeudi 21 janvier dès 20h55 sur ARTE ; suite et fin la semaine suivante.

Si le règne rouge sang d’Henri VIII n’en finit plus d’inspirer les réalisateurs – d’Anne des mille jours à Deux soeurs pour un roi en passant par la saga Les Tudors diffusée par ARTE –, Peter Kosminsky se démarque avec cette fresque relatant l’ascension de Thomas Cromwell, avocat de basse extraction propulsé au sommet de l’État par la seule force de son intelligence et de son ambition. Traversée par un souci constant du détail, jusque dans les éclairages à la bougie qui attisent la puissance picturale des clairs-obscurs, Wolf Hall s’appuie sur une mise en scène épurée et sur une narration sans à-coups qui servent la complexité des personnages et de leurs relations.

3 nominations aux Golden Globes et 5 nominations aux Emmy Awards.

Le début : 1529. Le roi Henri VIII tente d’obtenir l’annulation de son mariage avec Catherine d’Aragon, coupable de n’avoir pu lui donner un héritier mâle. Rendu responsable de l’enlisement des négociations avec Rome, le cardinal Wolsey est démis de ses fonctions de lord-chancelier et remplacé par Thomas More. Thomas Cromwell, avocat et homme de confiance du prélat, refuse de l’abandonner. Il rend visite à Anne Boleyn, la favorite d’Henri, qui brûle d’impatience de monter sur le trône, et décroche une entrevue avec le roi.

Réalisation : Peter Kosminsky
Scénario : Peter Straughan
d’après les romans de Hilary Mantel : Le conseiller – Dans l’ombre
des Tudors
et Le conseiller – Le pouvoir (Sonatine éditions)
Image : Gavin Finney
Montage : David Blackmore, Josh Cunliffe
Musique : Debbie Wiseman
Décors : Pat Campbell
Costumes : Joanna Eatwell

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Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles

Peter Kosminsky: ‘I thought I was a very odd choice for Wolf Hall’

Wolf Hall is No 2 in our end-of-year roundup. Here, the director talks about his nerves on showing Hilary Mantel the rough cuts, filming the most powerful moment of his career, and spending £30,000 on beeswax candles

Chitra Ramaswamy

Congratulations … Wolf Hall is up for three Golden Globes and is many people’s TV series of the year. Are you surprised that a slow, spare, complex, candlelit story about the Tudors, with an ending we already knew, has proved such a hit?

The scale of the audience surprised me. When we started, Wolf Hall was a fairly esoteric project. It was always going to be demanding: slow, political, with a lot of talking and not much action. I thought it would attract a small audience and was completely unprepared when we broke BBC2 box-office records and peaked at an audience of six million.

What do people continue to say to you about it?

The execution of Anne Boleyn – the last 10 minutes of the series – seems to have had a huge impact. I’ve been making television for 35 years and I can’t think of anything I’ve shot that was so powerful to make and that translated to the audience in this way. Continue reading Peter Kosminsky: ‘I thought I was a very odd choice for Wolf Hall’

Categories "Wolf Hall" News / Rumors

Candlelit Wolf Hall bathes in Golden Globe glory

West-based drama Wolf Hall is in the running for three Golden Globes in January.

Mark Rylance, Damian Lewis and the series itself have picked up nominations in the best limited series or TV movie category of the prestigious awards.

And the Bristol-made Shaun the Sheep The Movie is in the running for the best animated film at the awards ceremony to be hosted by Ricky Gervais.

Eddie Redmayne will go head to head with ten-time nominee Leonardo DiCaprio for the best actor in a drama. He has been nominated for his performance as transgender artist Lili Elbe in The Danish Girl, while DiCaprio received his 11th nod for his gruelling turn as Hugh Glass in revenge saga The Revenant. Continue reading Candlelit Wolf Hall bathes in Golden Globe glory

Categories "Little Dorrit" "The Crown" "The Promise" "Wolf Hall" "Wreckers" Articles

Claire Foy: an actor bringing a subtle talent to majestic roles

Her steely, understated approach won praise when playing Anne Boleyn in Wolf Hall and now Foy is taking on the role of Queen Elizabeth II in a new drama

Emine Saner

Some castings seem so obvious in retrospect. Pictures released this week show Claire Foy playing Queen Elizabeth II on her wedding day in 1947, and just as you cannot picture the older Elizabeth as anyone other than Helen Mirren, when The Crown, an ambitious 60-part Netflix drama, comes out next year, the younger version will probably be forever linked with Foy.

It is not just in the facial similarities; they both have the same tiny physical stature, but with a steely, slightly terrifying core, a thousand words summed up in a single glance.

She is not, of course, Foy’s first queen. As Anne Boleyn in the BBC’s recent stunning adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall, Foy had some of the best reviews of her career. Until Wolf Hall, she had been working steadily, but without the hype that many young actors at a similar point in their careers would attract. There was something quieter about her approach. She always seemed happier to be getting interesting roles, rather than boosting her own profile or becoming a ‘star ’. Her private life – she is married to the actor Stephen Campbell Moore and they recently had their first child – was similarly low key, and hardly tabloid fodder.

In interviews, she has said she is not interested in trying to break Hollywood and has never been comfortable being photographed: “I’m too conscious of looking like a dick. That’s the difference between a star and a normal person. I’ve never been someone who walks into a room and people gasp.” She is “not fussed” about exposure: “I’m never going to be a film star and I’m not chasing it. I’m very happy playing interesting parts.” It is an attitude that will work in her favour in the long run, though The Crown will almost certainly catapult her into another level of fame. Continue reading Claire Foy: an actor bringing a subtle talent to majestic roles

Categories "Wolf Hall" Articles Gallery

Royal Flush: The Women of Wolf Hall

Hilary Mantel’s triumphant Tudor novels enjoy a new life on stage and screen

By Sophie Elmhirst

In some ways, it was an accident. A few years ago, Hilary Mantel signed a contract with her publisher for two books: a modern novel set in Africa, and a Tudor novel set in the court of Henry VIII. ‘Theoretically, I was working on the African novel,’ she recalls, ‘and I thought I’d take a day off and play.’ Mantel wrote a line of dialogue and wanted to laugh with delight. She’d got it. She’d got him. Not Henry, but Thomas Cromwell, the King’s adviser and her leading man. There was his voice, clear on the page: his cool, all-seeing gaze. She was off. ‘I had to say to my publisher, “You won’t get that novel, but you will get this one, if you don’t mind.”’ They didn’t mind.

The beginning was an experiment, but the book had been long in the works. Mantel’s Cromwell novels are born of deep, marathon reading. She is as meticulous in her research as she is free and daring in her writing. The facts are rock-hard; the fiction elaborate. I first met her two years ago, on the day the second volume, Bring Up the Bodies, was published. It was already clear that something extraordinary was happening. Wolf Hall had been a hit, won the Booker, sold handsomely, and here she was with Bring Up the Bodies – the most intelligent political thriller you will ever lose a week to – nominated once more. Grateful as she was for the attention and praise, Mantel was impatient to get on with the next volume. Next year, she said, meaning 2013, was to be ‘uninterrupted’, devoted to writing.

It didn’t quite work out that way. A few weeks after we met, Mantel won the Booker for the second time: the first woman, and the first British writer, to do so. There was to be a play, a television adaptation. She was in constant demand. Two years later, the pace has barely slowed. The play, a sell-out hit for the RSC in Stratford and the West End, transfers to Broadway in the spring. The six-part, richly financed BBC production – with Damian Lewis as Henry, Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn, Mark Rylance as Cromwell – is soon to air. Her publisher, 4th Estate, gave me the latest figures: almost 1.5 million copies of Wolf Hall and just about a million copies of Bring Up the Bodies sold in the UK and the Commonwealth. The books have been published in 36 countries. Mantel has become an industry. Continue reading Royal Flush: The Women of Wolf Hall

Categories "Wolf Hall" Videos

Claire Foy on fate of outspoken Anne Boleyn in ‘Wolf Hall’ [Exclusive Video]

By Chris Beachum

“Even in the end when she is waiting to be executed, she’s very true to herself. She doesn’t pander to anyone or anything like that. I think she’s already a solid, strong person from beginning to end,” reveals actress Claire Foy about her real-life role as Queen Anne Boleyn in the limited series “Wolf Hall.” This six-part saga aired in the U.S. on PBS under the umbrella of “Masterpiece” programming.

In her recent interview with Gold Derby (watch below), Foy discusses in-depth her character, the second wife of King Henry VIII (Damian Lewis). While she was outspoken, her failure to produce a male offspring was eventually her downfall and led to a public beheading. She adds, “History would have been very, very different if she had a son… That’s all he wanted, and he was such a maniac for having (that). He wanted to continue the line as the throne would be safe.”

For this lavish British production, the behind-the-scenes team working on production design, costumes, hair and makeup helped the actors assume their roles. Foy says, “The locations we were in were extraordinary, and a lot of them were locations that had been visited by Henry VIII… The art department did some incredible things dressing it, but so much of it came from the buildings we were in. And the costumes were just extraordinary… and amazing to wear, painful but amazing.”

The series is based on two award-winning novels by Hilary Mantel, with the focus on the rise of royal advisor Thomas Cromwell (three-time Tony winner Mark Rylance) and his championing of a marriage between Henry and Anne in the early 16th century. Director Peter Kosminsky filmed the lavish production in some of the finest British medieval and Tudor houses.

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Categories "Wolf Hall" News / Rumors

Wolf Hall is coming to PBS

Tony® Award-winning actor Mark Rylance (Twelfth Night), Claire Foy (Little Dorrit, Wreckers, Season of the Witch, The Promise, White Heat, Macbeth) and Emmy® and Golden Globe® Award-winner Damian Lewis (Homeland) star in the six-hour television miniseries adapted from Hilary Mantel’s best-selling Booker Prize-winning novels: Wolf Hall and its sequel, Bring Up the Bodies. The television event presents an intimate and provocative portrait of Thomas Cromwell, the brilliant and enigmatic consigliere to King Henry VIII, as he maneuvers the corridors of power at the Tudor court. MASTERPIECE brings both of these works to life in Wolf Hall, airing on Sundays, April 5-May 10, 2015 at 10pm ET on MASTERPIECE on PBS.

Enjoy the masterful series with Mark Rylance, Claire Foy and Damian Lewis!