Jan 20,2015

The Herald Magazine (2015) Photoshoot in its entirety

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“Wolf Hall” starts on BBC Two on Wednesday 21 January at 9pm.



Jan 20,2015

Hilary Mantel, Peter Kosminsky, Claire Foy and Debbie Wiseman discuss how they adapted Wolf Hall

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Author Hilary Mantel, director Peter Kosminsky, actor Claire Foy and composer Debbie Wiseman discuss how they adapted the award-winning novel.



Jan 20,2015

The Independent Magazine (Scans) – To dress a King

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Thanks Chuckie for the exclusive scans.

Please credit or place a link back to our site if you decide to use them and don’t remove our tags. Thanks in advance.

Wolf Hall” starts on BBC Two on Wednesday 21 January at 9pm.



Jan 19,2015

Hot TV (Scans) – Mark Rylance stars as Thomas Cromwell in Wolf Hall

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Right-Hand Man — Mark Rylance stars as Thomas Cromwell in an epic new drama.

Looking for something to get your teeth into this month? Well, you’re in luck, because a major adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize-winning novels arrives on BBC2 this week and it’s a real animal.



Jan 19,2015

2015 Winter TCA Tour – Day 13

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2015 Winter TCA Tour - Day 13

(L-R) Executive producer Rebecca Eaton, actors Damian Lewis, Mark Rylance, director Peter Kosminsky and executive producer Colin Callender with actress Claire Foy (via satellite) speak onstage during the ‘MASTERPIECE “Wolf Hall”’ panel discussion at the PBS Network portion of the Television Critics Association press tour at Langham Hotel on January 19, 2015 in Pasadena, California.

2015-01-19-pbstcawintertour-wolfhallsession

“If ever there was a masterpiece on ‘Masterpiece,’ this is it,” Rebecca Eaton, exec producer of PBS’ “Masterpiece,” said at Monday’s Television Critics Assn. panel for “Wolf Hall.” The six-part miniseries, based on Hilary Mantel’s book and its sequel “Bring Up the Bodies,” stars “Homeland’s” Damian Lewis, Mark Rylance and Claire Foy.

Lewis, whose character, Nicholas Brody, was killed off in Showtime’s hit, for which he won an Emmy, said King Henry VIII is a part he’s excited to tackle.

“My vanity will always relish a challenge,” Lewis said. “In fact, that probably encourages me.”

Assuring the room of reporters he’s not afraid to take on such a weighty role, Lewis said, “There’s a real opportunity to look differently at a period of history that is loved and well known.” He’s also excited to bring new light to the “syphilitic, philandering Elvis people think [King Henry VIII] is.”

“Henry, as a brand, is right up there with Coca Cola,” Lewis said. “In terms of brand recognition, you have to go look at other things, and I think we have.”

“Wolf Hall,” exec produced by Colin Callender and directed by Peter Kosminsky, debuts on PBS April 5. The drama runs through May 10.

Source: Variety

More from the PBS TCA Winter Press Tour:
Deadline – Damian Lewis Says Henry VIII As Big A Brand As Coca Cola



Jan 19,2015

‘Wolf Hall’ Now Available for Pre-order on DVD/ Blu-ray

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Wolf Hall is now available for pre-order on DVD and Blu-ray in the UK. According to Amazon.co.uk, it will be released on March 2nd. Also note, the soundtrack is set for release on March 9th. For a sample of composer Debbie Wiseman’s score, check out this clip from the Woman’s Hour program on BBC Radio 4.

WolfHall_AmazonUK

Thanks to our Elite affiliate Damian-Lewis.com for the news.



Jan 19,2015

Wolf Hall Q&A Interview Panel

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Sunday Express TV Editor David Stephenson has uploaded the audio of the Q&A interview panel that was done after a screening of Wolf Hall episode 1 back on December 10th. Damian Lewis, Mark Rylance, Claire Foy, director Peter Kosminsky, writer Peter Straughan, and executive producer Colin Callender were there for the interview. Damian comes in at the 19.08 mark.

Here is a photo tweeted by Rajiv Nathwani, social media manager of BBC1 and BBC2, from the Q&A. Thank you for sharing!

2014-12-10-wolfhallpanelinterview-01-preview-560x482

Here are a couple write-ups from that Q&A:
The Telegraph – Wolf Hall TV show uses ‘too small’ Tudor codpieces
Deadline – ‘Wolf Hall’ Creatives & Cast On Codpieces, Tudor Politics And Killing Anne Boleyn
theartsdesk.com – Wolf Hall comes to BBC Two
Radio Times – Wolf Hall director Peter Kosminsky urges the nation not to “p**s away” the BBC



Jan 18,2015

Wolf Hall – Trailer and Clips Screencaptures

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Jan 18,2015

The Herald Magazine (2015) Photoshoot

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Jan 17,2015

Claire Foy on playing Anne Boleyn and getting her head chopped off

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Drama Queen – Claire Foy on the trials and tribulations of becoming Anne Boleyn for the television adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall.

Thanks Chuckie for the exclusive scans.

Please credit or place a link back to our site if you decide to use them and don’t remove our tags. Thanks in advance.

Wolf Hall” starts on BBC Two on Wednesday 21 January at 9pm.



Jan 17,2015

Wolf Hall’s Damian Lewis: ‘We try to give a more varied portrait of Henry VIII’

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THE Homeland star plays King Henry VIII in Wolf Hall, a gripping new BBC drama that reassesses the role of one of history’s arch-villains, Thomas Cromwell

By Vicki Power

Packed with intrigue, sex, scandal, royals and seismic change, the tumultuous tale of how King Henry VIII broke with the Catholic Church in order to marry his second wife, Anne Boleyn, is one of the most thrilling in our history.

It’s no surprise that the story has been rendered on film and television dozens of times and its cast of characters are as well known to us as the Mitchells on EastEnders.

But this week we’ll hear a different spin on the tale. BBC1’s lavish new drama Wolf Hall tells this chunk of English history solely from the viewpoint of Henry’s ruthless right-hand man, Thomas Cromwell.

It’s based on Hilary Mantel’s 2009 Booker Prize-winning historical novel of the same name, in which she controversially recast Cromwell not as the arch-villain of history but as a sympathetic, suave and brilliant fixer to the king whose actions are understandable even when they are incredibly brutal.

“I like stories where people change. And this character changes a lot.” – Mark Rylance

Acclaimed theatre star Mark Rylance tackles the role of Cromwell, with Damian Lewis as the capricious Henry VIII and Little Dorrit’s Claire Foy as ambitious queen-to-be Anne Boleyn.

In the first episode we meet Cromwell as a happily married father of three before he goes to work for Henry VIII. As legal secretary to Cardinal Wolsey (Jonathan Pryce), the former Lord Chancellor, Cromwell is trying to get his beleaguered master restored to the King’s good favour. Wolsey has been cast out after failing to get the Pope to agree to annul his marriage to Catherine of Aragon.

Henry wants to marry Anne and produce a male heir – Henry and Catherine’s only surviving child is Mary, later Queen (or Bloody) Mary. Also, tragedy strikes the Cromwell household as a fatal epidemic claims the lives of his wife, Elizabeth, and two young daughters.

Rylance, best known for his 1995-2005 stint as artistic director of London’s Globe Theatre, says he was drawn to the part after his wife, musical director and composer Claire van Kampen, praised the books to him. “I like stories where people change,” he says. “And this character changes a lot.” Read the rest of this entry »



Jan 17,2015

Actress Claire Foy talks about her character Anne Boleyn in Wolf Hall

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By Czarina Nicole O. Ong

Actress Claire Foy has been given the role of Anne Boleyn in the BBC 10-episode series Wolf Hall, and she talks about the challenges she encountered portraying the infamous love of King Henry VIII of England.

“The more auditions I did, the more I didn’t know who she was,” Foy told The Independent. But she did try her best in understanding the workings of her mind in order to give a better, more honest portrayal of the queen who lost her head.

“Anne didn’t see any limitations in what she could achieve. She saw that she was very bright and could charm people, even if they hated her. Her real downfall was that she couldn’t leave well enough alone: she was supposed to be silent and graceful and admired, but wouldn’t be that ethereal figure. She wanted to be in the thick of it.”

But understanding Boleyn wasn’t even half of her challenge. Her pregnancy, of course, made it difficult for the actress to get into character because of all the hormones acting up.

“I’m normally very focused, especially if it’s an emotional scene,” Foy said. “But I was sitting going: there’s nothing happening here, I’m completely dead inside. I thought I’d lost the ability to act. When I did realize I was pregnant and that my hormones were going slightly mad, I couldn’t tell anyone. The costumes were hot and tight, but I couldn’t complain so I was just angry with everyone all the time.”

Despite her emotions, what Foy wanted, of course, was for the audience to be completely enamored by the show, the same way she was with Pride and Prejudice.

“As a teenager I watched Pride and Prejudice with my cousins every weekend under the duvet, and made no connection to literature or anything,” she recalled. “I was just completely involved. I’d love it if people responded to this in the same way.”

Source



Jan 17,2015

Claire Foy on Wolf Hall – Time for a little history.

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By Teddy Jamieson

The actress Claire Foy plays Anne Boleyn in the new BBC historical drama series Wolf Hall. But how’s her own knowledge of the Tudor era? Let’s test her. Complete this sentence, Claire. “Henry the Eighth was a …”

“A bit of a tyrant, I think,” Foy says, smiling, as we sit in an office in central London. “He was like the perfect king. He was tall. He was strong. He had red hair.”

Red hair? Maybe that’s why the BBC chose Damien Lewis to play him in this new adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s novel.

“He was the most English, virile bloke,” Foy continues. “He was amazing at all sports. But he really did do some incredibly dubious, sly, untoward things. He was a kid really. He couldn’t deal with the consequences of any of his decisions. He got other people to do everything for him. And how could you sentence your wife to death and meanwhile be in the country romancing another girl and never think about her? It shows how tyrannical he could be.”

So, we’re agreed then Claire. Henry the Eighth was a sociopath. “Yes, I think that’s definitely the word. But then saying that, he was incredibly charming and gregarious.”

Do we know that though? Who would have dared tell the King he was being rude? Yeah, Foy agrees. “He could just have been horrible and flatulent. But Damien was very charming.”

So what can have we learned? Perhaps that Damien Lewis does not fart on set. Good to know. We’ve also learned that Claire Foy has done her research about the Tudors. She was a big fan of Mantel’s novel even before she was approached to appear in Peter Kosminsky’s new drama. The star of TV dramas Little Dorrit and Promises was worried that she wouldn’t be able to play Anne because, having read the book, she didn’t actually like her very much.

Even now, she admits, it’s difficult to understand Boleyn’s actions. “A lot of the stuff she did I just couldn’t get my head around. She’s really religious but she is incredibly cruel to people and if something’s wrong she deliberately takes it out on other people straight away. She just instantly lashes out. Read the rest of this entry »



Jan 17,2015

Claire Foy talks about playing Anne Boleyn in Wolf Hall

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Claire Foy has admitted that dressing up in period costume for new drama Wolf Hall isn’t as glamorous as it might seem.

The Upstairs Downstairs actress plays Anne Boleyn, eventual wife of Henry VIII (Damian Lewis), in the new BBC Two drama.

“In the first few weeks, the dresses were magical and amazing,” the 30-year-old said.

“But then it gets to July and you’re in a stately home, not able to drink water, sit down, not really able to breathe, and you’re regretting asking for the corset to be so tight in the fitting,” she said of filming the Tudor epic.

Claire found her character, in the adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies, more sympathetic than the “cliched Anne Boleyn version” she learnt about in school.

“She is this amazingly strong woman living in this man’s world, and she has [traditionally] got to be seen as hormonal and a bit mad,” she said.

“I felt a lot of compassion for this woman. She was an incredible character with such spirit and an amazing person to be around, but she was too much of a powerful opponent for Cromwell, so she had to go.”

Wolf Hall begins on BBC Two on Wednesday, January 21.

Source



Jan 15,2015

Radio Times (Scans) – Wolf Hall: Damian Lewis & Hilary Mantel on 2015’s biggest drama

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He’s one of history’s great villains. So how did the author of Wolf Hall turn Thomas Cromwell into Henry VIII’s hero?

[…]

“The fall of Anne Boleyn is the subject of Bring Up the Bodies, my second Cromwell novel. The novel, and the TV retelling, ends with her execution. Why revisit some of the best-known events in English history? It seemed to me that at the core of the story there was something missing. There was a moving area of darkness where Cromwell ought to be. Much studied by academic historians, he appears in popular history as an all-purpose, pre-packaged villain. In fiction and drama he’s just off the page or in the wings, doing something nefarious: but what? I wanted to put the spotlight on him; more than that, I wanted to get behind his eyes, the eyes of a man obscurely born, and watch as his country shapes itself about him, a dazzle of possibility.” — Hilary Mantel



Jan 15,2015

The Tudor godfather: Henry VIII’s court was as brutal as any Mafia clan

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By Daphne Lockyer

A pale and dignified Anne Boleyn picks her way across the rough terrain in elegant little shoes, en route to her own execution.

Above her the sky is growing darker and more ominous by the moment. The blustery wind ripples through her ermine cape and buffets the skirts of her damask gown – its deep grey colour chosen to neutralise the bright red blood that’s about to flow.

The scaffold itself is a gruesome sight. There’s the executioner, ordered from Calais, and the glint of the 4ft-long sword that will dispatch her.

Before the end, of course, we must hear the famous, final speech – delivered by Anne while kneeling at the block – the one in which this former Queen of England, now dumped, divorced, divested of her title and about to be decapitated on the say-so of her husband Henry VIII, talks of his goodness.

‘I pray God save the King… For a gentler nor a more merciful prince there never was. Oh Lord, have mercy on me, to God I commend my soul,’ she adds, before the blade falls – at which precise moment of filming, the heavens decide to open and the rain begins to fall.

This is one of the pivotal scenes in the BBC’s brilliant six-part adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s duo of Booker Prize-winning historical novels, Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies, starring theatre veteran Mark Rylance as Thomas Cromwell and Damian Lewis as Henry VIII.

Claire Foy, the actress who plays the doomed Boleyn, is still reeling from the execution scene, days later. ‘Everything on that day – including the weather – was just so heightened,’ she explains. Read the rest of this entry »



Jan 15,2015

The Independent (2015) Photoshoot – Wolf Hall Promotion

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Beautiful, glowing pregnant Claire!



Jan 14,2015

TV Times (Scans) – TV Times meets the cast of Wolf Hall

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“I think, probably, every actor in England went up for a part in this,” jokes Claire Foy, 30 (who starred in Peter Kosminsky’s 2011 C4 political drama The Promise). “And the really lucky ones, like me got included.”



Jan 14,2015

What’s On TV (Scans) – Damian Lewis stars as King Henry VIII in Wolf Hall

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“Anne Boleyn had an extraordinary power over the King,” says Damian Lewis. “Henry was so infatuated with her, he pursued her for five years. He’s also driven by his obsession over a male heir.”



Jan 14,2015

Wolf Hall – Episode 6 – Stills

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Jan 14,2015

TV & Satellite Week – 17 January 2015 (Scans) – Damian Lewis and Claire Foy reveal what makes Wolf Hall’s Tudor England different and darker

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Power, corruption and lies — Damian Lewis and Claire Foy reveal what makes Wolf Hall‘s Tudor England different and darker.

“I’m not playing Henry as the womanising, syphilitic, genocidal, bloated Elvis character that people probably expect.” — Damian Lewis

[…]

“For example, I’d read stuff about Anne Boleyn having warts and six fingers,” laughs Foy. “Fortunately I wasn’t asked to play her that way”.

As well as that, she was also said to be promiscuous. “Her critics, and there were lots of them, called her ‘The Great Whore’, and claimed she had special tricks in the bedroom that she’d learned in the French court, which was why Henry fell in love with her. But, actually, it’s far more likely that she was a virgin, who kept Henry waiting for five long years.

“She was smart and knew exactly how to play him, although in the end, of course, it didn’t stop him from having her executed,” continues Foy.



Jan 13,2015

Anne Boleyn – Wolf Hall: Trailer – BBC Two

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“Those who have been made, can be unmade.” Claire Foy stars as Anne Boleyn alongside Mark Rylance as Thomas Cromwell in ‪Wolf Hall‬. The six-part series begins Wednesday 21 January, 9pm.



Jan 13,2015

Wolf Hall Q&A with Hilary Mantel and Claire Foy BFI (Video)

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Author Hilary Mantel, director Peter Kosminsky, actor Claire Foy and composer Debbie Wiseman discuss how they adapted the award-winning novel.

Claire Foy Wolf Hall



Jan 12,2015

The Financial Times (2015) Photoshoot

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Jan 12,2015

Telegraph Magazine Scans: Games of Throne

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Authenticity is everything in the BBC adaptation of Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel’s take of Tudor intrigue, right down to the very last pin on an extra’s costume.

Thanks Chuckie for the exclusive scans.

Please credit or place a link back to our site if you decide to use them and don’t remove our tags. Thanks in advance.

Wolf Hall” starts on BBC Two on Wednesday 21 January at 9pm.



Jan 11,2015

Claire Foy interview: The ‘Wolf Hall’ star on politics in the Tudor court and Hollywood

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Foy is unforgettable as doomed queen Anne Boleyn in the six-part BBC adaptation, to be broadcast later this month

By Gabriel Tate

Claire Foy has been thinking about babies a lot recently. The reason is plain as soon as the 30-year-old walks into her publicist’s office. She’s unmistakably, gloriously pregnant (her first child with new husband and fellow actor Stephen Campbell Moore), and, with my own new parenthood looming imminently, I can’t help gasping in admiration. We then spend a frankly unprofessional amount of our allotted time sharing assorted hopes and fears before agreeing it might be best for our respective careers if we talked shop.

Foy’s latest role, as Anne Boleyn in the BBC’s Wolf Hall, means this segue isn’t as awkward as it might have been: Boleyn’s fate was determined by her fecundity. As to Anne’s psychology, however, she remains a conundrum. It’s no disservice to Foy, Hilary Mantel, or Peters Straughan and Peter Kosminsky, who have written and directed the six-part adaptation of Mantel’s Booker-winning diptych about the life of Thomas Cromwell (Mark Rylance), to suggest that she’s as unknowable at the end of the BBC’s six-part Wolf Hall as she was at the outset. Read the rest of this entry »



Jan 11,2015

Actress Charity Wakefield on playing the other Boleyn girl

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I really like the fact that Charity Wakefield and Claire Foy, who play the Boleyn sisters, took their time to research the characters they played:

“Anne was called the Great Whore by people who didn’t like her. But Claire and I talked about it and researched it and we’re pretty sure that, actually, she was a virgin until Henry and that was all part of her determination to become the queen.”

Read more in a new interview with Charity Wakefield, who plays Mary Boleyn: Daily Mail

Source: Wolf Hall TV on Facebook



Jan 08,2015

The Times Magazine Interview – Damian Lewis: from Eton to Wolf Hall (Scans)

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Thanks Chuckie for the exclusive scans.

Please credit or place a link back to our site if you decide to use them and don’t remove our tags. Thanks in advance.

Wolf Hall” starts on BBC Two on Wednesday 21 January at 9pm.



Jan 05,2015

Accuracy is king in the most eagerly anticipated TV event of the year… but how does Wolf Hall stand up to the scrutiny of one historian?

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By Lucy Worsely

His Tudor costume weighs a ton, held together by a complex arrangement of pins; there are no sewing-machine seams, zips or modern fastenings to simplify the laborious chore of dressing.

Yet Homeland star Damian Lewis is not only comfortable in King Henry VIII’s velvet robes, but is alarmed – and delighted – to discover character traits he shares with England’s most famous king.

Like Henry, he suffered concussion after an accident – though he tumbled from a motorbike, rather than from a steed during a vigorous bout of jousting.

I was intrigued to find Lewis shared the latest historical theory that the accident may have triggered great change in the monarch and led to his descent into tyranny and darkness.

‘I’ve suffered from concussion myself from a motorbike crash,’ he explains.

‘I spent three months afterwards getting into needless fights and suffering from bouts of depression, unable to watch TV or read because of migraines.

‘I would often not get dressed and just do puzzles in my flat.

‘So I think it’s absolutely plausible that it had an effect on Henry’s character.’

He adds: ‘I think we all have an understanding that Henry was a womanising, syphilitic, bloated, genocidal Elvis character.

‘But in the period I play him he had a 32in waist and was much taller than anyone else. His beautiful pale complexion was often remarked on.

‘I found that the grandiose, more paranoid, self-indulgent, self-pitying, cruel Henry emerged in the period after this.’

Lewis is playing King Henry in Wolf Hall, the ambitious six-part BBC television series based on Hilary Mantel’s Booker prize-winning novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies. The programme will be screened on BBC2 this month.

After the success of the books, and the smash-hit stage play with the Royal Shakespeare Company, the stellar cast (with the likes of Mark Rylance, Claire Foy and Jonathan Pryce alongside Lewis) has made the TV production the most talked-about BBC drama in decades.

On the day I have exclusive access to the set and actors, at Bristol Cathedral (one of 40 locations selected for filming), they are shooting the coronation of a heavily pregnant Anne Boleyn (played by Claire Foy).

Of Boleyn, Foy says: ‘I think she was born at the wrong time. She was really a modern woman who believed that she could rise above where she was born.

‘She didn’t see any restrictions on what her opinions should be, or what she could read. She was incredibly intelligent, especially about herself, what her charms were and weren’t.

‘She was obviously an incredible character with such spirit, but she was just that bit too much of a powerful opponent for Cromwell, so she had to go.’

There are 16 make-up artists among the production team of 80, and disarray is caused by the constant doffing of caps (there are eight minutes of cap-doffing in the entire series).

About 70 per cent of the cast are wearing either wigs or hairpieces, and the constant Tudor on-and-off takes its toll on them.

Also present are 74 courtiers, six bishops, six knights and four royal guards. (And still they don’t fill the cathedral.)

Foy reveals that the ‘baby bump’ is uncomfortable under her costume, and isn’t sure how to ‘prostrate’ herself to the ground before the altar.

With his customary attention to detail, director Peter Kosminsky asks me, as a historian, how she should do it.

We agree that two of Anne’s ladies in waiting should help their pregnant mistress down to the floor. Read the rest of this entry »



Jan 04,2015

“Wolf Hall” to premiere on BBC Two on 21 January, 2015 at 9pm

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Wolf Hall” starts on BBC Two on Wednesday 21 January at 9pm.

You can now purchase “Wolf Hall” & “Bring up the Bodies” by Hilary Mantel, with brand new covers!

Covers

Source



Jan 02,2015

Wolf Hall: A major adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize-winning novels

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Date: 02.01.2015
Category: BBC Two; Drama

Two-time Olivier and three-time Tony Award winner Mark Rylance is Thomas Cromwell in a major adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Booker Prize-winning novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up The Bodies for BBC Two and Masterpiece on PBS.

“Once you have exhausted the process of negotiation and compromise, once you have fixed on the destruction of an enemy, that destruction must be swift and it must be perfect. Before you even glance in his direction, you should have his name on a warrant, the ports blocked, his wife and friends bought, his heir under your protection, his money in your strong room and his dog running to your whistle. Before he wakes in the morning, you should have the axe in your hand.”

Bafta-winning director Peter Kosminsky (The Government Inspector, The Promise) directs the flagship drama that presents an intimate portrait of Thomas Cromwell, the brilliant consigliere to King Henry VIII, as he manoeuvres the corridors of power at the Tudor court. The story follows the complex machinations and back room dealings of this pragmatic and accomplished power broker – from humble beginnings and an enigmatic past – who must serve king and country while navigating deadly political intrigue, the King’s tempestuous relationship with Anne Boleyn and the religious upheavals of the Protestant reformation.

Oscar-nominated Peter Straughan (The Men Who Stare At Goats, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy) has adapted both novels for the screen.

Emmy-winner Damian Lewis is Henry VIII and Claire Foy (The Promise) plays the calculating and ambitious Anne Boleyn in the drama which is a Playground Entertainment and Company Pictures production.

Hilary Mantel says: “My expectations were high and have been exceeded: in the concision and coherence of the storytelling, in the originality of the interpretations, in the break from the romantic clichés of the genre, in the wit and style and heart.

“The spirit of the books has been extraordinarily well preserved. The storytelling is fast and fluid, the characters compelling, the tone fits that of the novels,

“Mark Rylance gives a mesmeric performance as Cromwell, its effect building through the series.” Read the rest of this entry »



Jan 02,2015

Media packs / Wolf Hall / Claire Foy is Anne Boleyn

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Claire Foy is Anne Boleyn

Date: 10.12.2014
Category: BBC Two

How did you approach the role of Anne Boleyn?

I did a lot of research but it is difficult with Anne because there is no hard evidence or first-hand account of what she was like. Obviously at her trial and her execution there are lots of people talking about her, but much of the time the information you get is that she wasn’t particularly attractive, no one understood why the king wanted anything to do with her – all those kinds of clichés, people saying she had six fingers and warts. It is quite difficult when you are approaching it to find that true material.

Hilary (Mantel)– in the books and Peter (Straughan) in the scripts – write Anne seen from Cromwell’s perspective, so he only sees things in her that he relates to, or the things that he finds interesting. So it was my job to figure out the other side of Anne that you don’t see; like when she is in a scene having a hissy fit, understanding why that might be as opposed to thinking she is this mad woman. I had to figure that out for myself, with the help of the research that I did and imagining how mad her life must have been.

I fell in love with the way Hilary writes and how you genuinely feel you are in the room with these people. So when my agent told me I had the audition I was so worried I would let them all down, let Anne Boleyn down as I had such a clear idea of what she was like in my head…to then have the words come out of my mouth, I struggled to get my head around that at first. Read the rest of this entry »



Dec 16,2014

New still of Claire Foy as Anne Boleyn – after the coronation

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I think this might be the scene after Anne Boleyn’s coronation, when Cromwell visits pregnant Anne in her bedchamber. The fragment from “Wolf Hall“:

“The bedcurtains are drawn close. He pulls them back. Anne is lying in her shift. She looks flat as a ghost, except for the shocking mound of her six-month child. In her ceremonial robes, her condition had hardly showed, and only that sacred instant, as she lay belly-down to stone, had connected him to her body, which now lies stretched out like a sacrifice: her breasts puffy beneath the linen, her swollen feet bare.”

One of my favourite scenes in the book. The dynamics between Anne & Cromwell is amazing.


Source



Dec 15,2014

Wolf Hall TV show sets prepare for tourist invasion

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New BBC drama set locations ready for influx of tourists

By Ruth Doherty

The National Trust is preparing for an influx of visitors to properties chosen as location sets for the new TV adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall.

The properties in Somerset, Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire were chosen as they provided the perfect backdrop for filming the story of Thomas Cromwell’s rise to power in the court of Henry VIII.

The six-part BBC series, set to be broadcast next month, stars Damian Lewis as Henry VIII and Mark Rylance as Thomas Cromwell.

Six British National Trust venues were chosen for to film scenes for the show. Montacute House, in Somerset, was used as the set for Greenwich Palace, Henry VIII’s main London seat and the scene of Anne Boleyn’s arrest.

Lacock Abbey, also used in two Harry Potter films, will be seen as the exterior of Wolf Hall, the Seymour family seat. Read the rest of this entry »



Dec 14,2014

New camera technology meant Wolf Hall adaptation could be shot by candlelight

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Ian Burrell

Hilary Mantel has praised the “visual flair” of the BBC’s adaptation of her Booker Prize winning novel Wolf Hall, which uses latest camera technology to film by candlelight in Tudor halls and country homes.

The director of the six-part series, Peter Kosminsky, who is known for his minute attention to authentic detail, used an Arri Alexa camera to film all the night-time scenes by candlelight.

“With the advent of the Alexa camera it is actually possible to shoot by candlelight,” he said. “One of the extraordinary things was to be in some of these rooms where the characters had stood and to light the rooms as they had been built to be lit – not by floodlights and space lanterns in the ceiling but by candlelight.”

He recalled one scene with Mark Rylance, who stars as lawyer and statesman Thomas Cromwell, began with six candles burning and continued when only one was still alight. “The technology has allowed us to get a level of authenticity,” he said. Read the rest of this entry »



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